financial futures report

The Financial Futures Report is a daily newsletter written by veteran commodity broker, Carley Garner, and provided to DeCarley Trading brokerage clients.  We post the Financial Futures Report to this website periodically, click here to see the archives of such posts: Financial Futures Report (Futures Trading Newsletter) Archive Sample 

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    The E-mini S&P traded lower two days in a row for the first time since late September.

    Although losses were minimal, the ES managed to settle in the red on two consecutive trading sessions to close out last week. In a normal market this wouldn't be worth a mention, but in this market, it is a rare occurrence. The last consecutive negative closes took place on September 25th and 26th. Before that, you have to scroll the chart back to early August!

    I doubt the _bulls_ are concerned in light of the fact that the ES is within 15 points of its all-time-highs. On the flip side, the _bears_ must be growing concerned over the fact that the seasonal tendencies from Thanksgiving through the end of the year generally call for higher stock prices.

    That said E-mini S&P futures traders are holding one of the longest positions we've seen this year. Thus, one has to wonder if the bulls will soon run out of capital. After all, most of the bears have already been squeezed out of positions. This is true even in the stock market, the percentage of outstanding short positions on individual equity products is near record lows.

  • Generally speaking, the stock index futures markets stumble into October

    The last week (or so) of September is notoriously weak for equities, and strong for Treasuries. We don't see any reason to buck the seasonal trend. After all, Friday's bloodbath on Wall Street is a sure fire sign that investors have not gotten over the mid-August stock market "crash".

    Although the Fed meeting is behind us, we still have to worry about the details of Janet Yellen's speech on Thursday at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Oddly enough, the financial markets sometimes react to non-FOMC speeches than they do the official Fed meetings. Be prepared for volatility.

  • the financial futures report

    Crude and the Yen reverse yesterday's moves, so does the ES

    Obviously, the market panicked a bit when in regard to the implication of a Yen rally. Although this is the highest we've seen the Yen in years, it is still historically cheap. Further, today's reversal suggests the unwinding of the carry trade isn't quite upon us. Accordingly, this should be somewhat supportive of the equity markets.

    On another note, the greenback is still trading sluggishly, but it has yet to break support. In theory, weakness in the dollar should help push commodity prices higher, and eventually the stock market as well. As a result, we'll need to keep an eye on the DX support near 93.00.

  • the financial futures report

    Even the most bearish of the bears couldn't have predicted the bloodbath we've seen in the equity index futures markets since posting a August 18th high. As experienced futures brokers, we've lived through the 2008 financial crisis, the 2010 flash crash, and the August 2011 Federal budget crisis collapse; however, we've never seen a sell off quite like this one.

    It is no secret that the U.S. equity markets were in desperate need of a "good" correction. In fact, many very smart (and otherwise successful) traders lost a lot of money attempting to time the down-draft. Nevertheless, it is difficult to rationalize this type of quick repricing in the absence of substantial changes in fundamentals. We certainly agree that the China story is worth monitoring, and will be a drag on the global economy but the truth is the U.S. economy only relies on exporting for 10 to 15% of GDP.

    The futures markets are ultimately driven by people, who are driven by emotions. Once the panic and the margin calls work their way out of the system, we suspect the e-mini S&P futures will recover sharply into year end. With that said, bottoms are a process...and they are messy. We'll likely see a retest of yesterday's flushing low, or moderately lower (1800ish), before real buying comes into the ES futures contract.

     

  • Financial Futures Market Trading Newsletter

    Import/export prices were a wash, retail sales were solid

    In the end, today's economic news wasn't anything to write home about, but more importantly it wasn't reason for stock traders to sell into resistance levels. In fact, the S&P was able to maintain yesterday's bullish trade in the face of swift down-trend-line resistance.  We see this as a sign of short-term strength...or at least a catalyst for more short covering.

    Tomorrow we'll hear about producer price pressures and consumer sentiment.  We doubt that either will be a market mover; instead the coming sessions will most likely be dominated by preparation for next week's Fed meeting (on the 17th), and the triple witch (on the 19th). These two events tend to be supportive for equities (at least going into the event), so the bears will most likely be fighting the tide.

  • the financial futures report

    For Futures Traders, the Countdown to the Fed is on

    Six days from now we'll finally find out whether or not the Fed believes initiating a rate hike is a good idea. The investment community is polarized by the debate, and it seems the Fed might be too. We are still of the belief that they won't be looking to make any moves until the October or December meeting (most likely December), but either way the impact on the economy will be minimal.

    Even if they raise the overnight borrowing rate a full percentage point over the next year, funds will be historically cheap. With that said, we will likely see a knee jerk reaction to the first rate hike but that doesn't mean the actual value of financial assets have changed. More often than not, equity markets moved higher overall in the early stages of a rate hike campaign.

  • The Fed and triple witching Friday are generally bullish events for the stock market

    Although the CME has mitigated some of the impact of the triple witch with their addition of weekly expiring options, the event still influences the quarterly expirations (March, June, September, and December). The most common course of action is a short squeeze going into expiration. In this particular instance, we are referring to Friday, June 17th. The squeeze higher often extends itself into the time the June contract goes off the board, which will be at 8:30 am Friday morning. Accordingly, those wishing to get bearish this market should look for opportunities late next week.

    Similarly, Fed meetings have generally enticed S&P buyers in the days before the FOMC's interest rate policy announcement. The two-day meeting begins on Tuesday, so we could see some buying early in the week.

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    It's been a confusing day for the financial futures markets

    Last week we heard several Federal Reserve Presidents tout their hawkish stance; they went as far as to say an April rate hike is on the table. However, the Fed Chair Janet Yellen, took the other side of that argument in her speech to the Economic Club of New York. She emphasized measured and gradual rate hikes were the "only" way to go. She reiterated, the pace will be so slow the process could take years. However, she also stipulated the decisions made in each FOMC meeting will be data dependent.

    It seem to us, market participants would be better served simply ignoring the chatter of Fed Presidents, and focusing solely on the Chairman. Doing so would certainly reduce some of the noise caused by overzealous speculators.

    Contrary to the Fed Chair's suggestion that the economy still needs to be nursed back to life, Pending home sales were up 3.5% in February and the Case-Shiller 20-city Index saw a 5.7% increase in January. Further, the March Consumer Confidence Index jumped to 96.2.

  • ZB and ES futures trading newsletter

    GDP surprises to the upside, but weak oil futures going into the weekend negates the benefits

    Stronger WTI crude oil futures trade overnight, and the flirting of an upside breakout, had the ES buyers in full bloom. However, the crude rally was rejected by technical resistance and later in the day suffered from a smaller than expected decline in operating rigs in the U.S. Accordingly, the U.S. equity indices failed to hold overnight gains.

    On a positive note, the second estimate of second quarter GDP was reported at 1%. Under normal circumstances, this would be a disappointment but in today's sluggish environment it could almost be categorized as a blockbuster report. To boot, personal spending and personal income ticked higher along with the final reading of Michigan Sentiment.

    This is the first time, in quite a while, we've seen a string of positive economic data. Until now, the trend has been for good news to be followed by bad. Now that data is firming up we have a hard time believing the S&P will revisit the low 1800s any time soon. Nevertheless, the last few trading days in February are normally weak, so we could see a few days of back and filling before heading higher.

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